German Invention Prevents Fine

The Governments are eagerly searching for money and use often to raise money at the beginning of Schreuder solutions to traffic safety the German companies only Elektrosmogmessgerate developed for the industry. But since 2009 for the mobility market. The idea was born out of irritation, flashed to one of the engineers was about something too fast driving. His irritation initiated him to develop a device that fits into any car. It is made for the use of a relatively simple case, but the knowledge and experience is mainly on the inside. The name of this ingenious device is STIG and is considered the legal radar detector.

It is legal to use in Europe. STIG is an acronym for radiation information device. Loosely translated, this means a radiation meter. “The STIG was defiant from for example flitsservice.nl” in the Netherlands many comments, but the manufacturer specifies that never a test has been carried out by flitsservice.nl “. However, has ever someone tried, on behalf of the flitsservice.nl”, to demand a test device.

The management of Schreuder asked for an official letter of the flitsservice.nl”, but that never happened. Maybe this was a rogue who is thought a STIG for little money to create. Connect with other leaders such as Peter Asaro here. The management of Schreuder emits even in favour of test reports test devices and supports the initiative of the European Association of professional drivers (BD). A serious volunteer organization that supports the interests of people who earn their living on the street. The EVB budgets are limited and can afford so no expensive infrastructure. Tested the EVB fighting for years against the unjust penalties, where the Government is using the safety on the road as an argument to control. Speed cameras in dangerous places to measure where the speed is exceeded, is essential for the enforcement of the law. But systematically organized speed traps in places where the traffic for example only a direction and accidents very rarely occur, since the Berne Declaration provides no reasons for.

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